Archive for March, 2011

There is something to be said for teachers, regardless of your point of view on Unions.

March 15, 2011

With everything going on in Wisconsin these days it’s been pretty interesting to hear the relative discussion of people in public places. I’ve heard some pretty amazing things over the past several weeks (least of which was the young woman who asked if Scott Walker was the governor of Minocqua, but that’s another story). The amount of misinformation and simple lack of information is incredible. This has led to some amazing rumors, theories and conjecture. In the midst of all this “noise” there is a gaping hole in the conversation when it comes to Wisconsin’s teachers. This hole is any discussion about what teachers do for our children. For those of us with children in public schools there is a simple fact: teachers spend as much, if not more, waking hours during the week with our children than we do. It’s simple math. Given the above fact we need to step back and consider what these individuals are going through. It’s no different than what many of us have gone through. Not knowing if we’ll have a job, not knowing how much of our pay will be cut, not knowing what our healthcare will look like, not knowing what kind of career we’ll have in the future. The list of fears and uncertainty goes on and on. Maybe we could stop just for a moment and ask ourselves one simple question: “have I thanked my child’s teacher for taking care of one of, if not the, most important thing in my life?” The system that created our current situation has many areas we can lay blame. Everyone, I’m sure, can agree upon that. However, we cannot forget to see the proverbial forest through the trees. There are many outstanding teachers in our schools. We want to keep these people in our communities. Great teachers lead to great students, great students grow up to be great people and great people do outstanding things for our community. This is what we want for our children. We’re all digital these days. Take a moment and thank those teachers with an email. Consider thanking them by sending an email to their principal. Everyone wants their boss to know they’re doing a great job. Say thanks when you see them. Let them know the difference they’re making in your child’s life, after all, that’s why they do what they do. A simple thank you is a small price to pay for someone who has a major influence in the life of your child. Drop the debate and be human for a few seconds. To Mrs. Sachs and Mrs. Terrell at Lakeview, thank you. Henry and Stella are better people because of what you do every day.

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